The New York Times Supporting US-Backed Coups

The New York Times’ Long History of Endorsing US-Backed Coups

To be sure, the New York Times is not the only major media outlet guilty of reflexively supporting every U.S. action around the world. The Economist and the Washington Post both came out to support the coup in Bolivia, as they had done before with Venezuela. But the Times’ position as “the paper of record” sets it apart in terms of importance.
This position makes it a crucial weapon in the propaganda war waged on the American people in order to manufacture consent for regime change abroad.

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Welcome to the Jungle

They lost a major battle. At least they now know this is hardcore, all-out war. To destroy Lula – the world’s foremost political prisoner – the Brazilian elites had to destroy Brazil. Still, Nietzsche always prevails; whatever doesn’t kill you makes you stronger. The vanguard of global resistance against neo-fascism as the higher stage of neoliberalism has now moved south of the Equator.

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Despite Bannon’s Role in Campaign, Bolsonaro is not Brazil’s Trump – He’s Far Worse

Though Bolsonaro’s appeals to “drain the swamp,” his shallow nationalism targeting “internal enemies,” and his new link to Steve Bannon evoke comparisons between him and Trump, such comparisons are misleading. They glibly write off a future Bolsonaro-led Brazil as being like a Trump-led United States, when the Brazilian edition is set to be much worse.

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Former President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva gestures to supporters at the headquarters of the Metalworkers’ Union where a Catholic mass was held in memory of his late wife Marisa Letícia on April 7, 2018 in São Paulo, Brazil.

A “Soft Coup” in Brazil’s Election Will Have Global Consequences. I Just Visited Lula, the World’s Most Prominent Political Prisoner.

The major corruption is legal. For example, the resort to tax havens that drain an estimated one-fourth or more of the $80 trillion global economy, creating an independent economic system free from surveillance and regulation, a haven for all sorts of criminal activities, as well as taxes. Nor is it technically illegal for Amazon, which just became the second trillion-dollar corporation, to have benefitted enormously by exemption from sales taxes. Or for the corporation to use about 2 percent of U.S. electricity at sharply reduced rates, following “a long U.S. tradition of shifting costs from businesses to poor residents, who already pay about three times more of their income on utility bills than do wealthy households.”

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